Economics serving society

HEALTH AND HAPPINESS - From Income and Inequality to Health and Happiness

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Everything you need to know about the 2019 Health & Happiness programme is in the dedicated brochure. Overview, Professors and schedule are also available below.

  • Do you have any questions? summer-school psemail.eu
  • You’ve chosen this programme and you want to apply? www.pse-application.eu

From June 24 to June 28, 2019

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OVERVIEW

… I have begun to be somewhat merry because I have been told that that is good for one’s health.” (Voltaire, Letter to the Abbé Trublet, 1761)

The summer school will be centered around health, happiness, income, and income inequality. Individual health and happiness measures are closely related. Indeed, people give a disproportionate weight to health in their general level of happiness (i.e. well-being), compared to other domains such as housing or social life. Moreover, the measures most used by researchers to capture health and happiness in surveys are subjective ordinal scales and similar methods may thus be employed to identify factors influencing health and well-being. This program, that studies health and happiness together, is designed to provide (1) an overview of health and happiness measures, focusing on subjective data and on Big Data, and (2) a discussion of the effect of income and income inequality on health and happiness, at the frontier of economic research. We will address the following set of questions. What is the relationship between health and happiness? Are subjective measures biased? If they are, what are the pros and cons of correcting them? How is Big Data changing academic research on health and well-being? Why does raising the incomes of all does not increase the happiness of all? How do economic conditions and income inequality influence health and well-being?

The first modules focus on the measurement of health and well-being. Subjective data have become increasingly popular in economic research and policy. First, measurement of subjective well-being and validity issues will be discussed. Correlates of well-being will be presented. In particular, the associations between of well-being and health (physiological measures) will be examined. We will also present the most commonly used health measures, distinguishing between objective and subjective data. The biases of self-reported, subjective measures will be highlighted, in the context of the measurement of health inequalities in particular. Models to address these limitations will be reviewed. Finally, given that Big Data analytics may revolutionize the way we do research, three modules will explore the possibilities of Big Data (administrative data and Google Trends, among others) in assessing health and well-being.

Using these different measures, the second part of the program will present evidence on the relationship between income and income inequality on the one hand, and health and well-being on the other hand. The main result of the economics of happiness literature is the so-called Easterlin paradox: average self-declared happiness does not increase during periods of sustained income growth, but income is positively correlated with subjective well-being in cross-sectional data. We will discuss the two mechanisms underlying the paradox, i.e. adaptation and comparison, which reduce or eliminate the benefits of income growth. Given the importance of income inequality and of policies that try to reduce it, we will also provide evidence on subjective perceptions of inequality. Moreover, the link between household income and health, i.e. “social health inequality,” will be examined, as we will discuss the causal impact of income on health. Finally, we will review the latest research on the effect of income inequality on health. Because estimating causal impacts has become the gold standard in economic analysis, the modules will always discuss appropriate identification strategies.

THEMES

  • Theme I: Measurement and validity of health and well-being, focusing on subjective data (instructors: Bénédicte Apouey, Sarah Fleche, and Carine Milcent)
  • Theme II: Big Data in health and well-being (instructors: Clément Bellet and Pierre-Yves Geoffard)
  • Theme III: Effect of income and income inequality on subjective well-being (instructors: Clément Bellet and Claudia Senik)
  • Theme IV: Impact of income and income inequality on health (instructors: Bénédicte Apouey and Daniel Waldenström)

WORKSHOP

Workshops will complement the lectures, where students will have the opportunity to present and discuss their work with fellow students and faculty. These interactive workshops will take place on Wednesday and Friday. Participants are encouraged to submit a paper in May to be presented at these workshops.

PREREQUISITES

Graduates in Economics with strong theoretical and empirical skills.

PROFESSORS

  • Bénédicte Apouey is a Research Professor in Health Economics at the PSE. She received her PhD from Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) in Paris in 2009 and was then awarded the Young Economist award from the European Economic Association. Her research focuses on social health inequalities, including the origins of disparities in childhood and the social determinants of healthy ageing. Current specific research interests include the longitudinal effect of parental socioeconomic status on child health using cohort data, as well as the impact of wealth on health among the elderly. https://www.parisschoolofeconomics.eu/en/apouey-benedicte/
  • Clément Bellet completed his Ph.D. in economics at Sciences Po Paris. He is currently a Post-Doctoral Fellow at INSEAD, where he is affiliated to the Marketing Department and Stone Center for the Study of Wealth Inequality. Clément is also a Research Associate in the Wellbeing Program at the London School of Economics. He was previously a visiting scholar at the University of California Berkeley and Post-Doctoral Fellow at the London School of Economics. His research examines ways in which inequality affects consumption and wellbeing due to social status externalities in individual preferences, in developed and developing countries. To answer these questions, he uses large-scale consumer surveys, scanner data, and other online datasets collected using web-scraping techniques (i.e. “Big Data”). He also borrows from branches of behavioral and marketing research more critical of revealed preferences approaches, like the literature on subjective wellbeing and emotions. He explores issues relative to conspicuous consumption and social status, inequality and poverty, marketing strategies and social incentives in the workplace. https://www.insead.edu/faculty-research/faculty/clement-bellet
  • Sarah Fleche is an applied economist and Assistant Professor at the Aix Marseille School of Economics, in France. Her research lies in the fields of labor, education and behavioral economics and has led to new insights into the role of schools on well-being development, mental health and determinants of well-being over the life course. Sarah is also an Associate Researcher at the Center for Economic Performance, London School of Economics. In 2018, she wrote with Andrew Clark, Richard Layard and coauthors a book on The Origins of Happiness published at Princeton University Press. Prior to joining Aix-Marseille University and the LSE, she received her Ph.D. from PSE and was a consultant for the OECD. https://sites.google.com/site/sarahfleche/home
  • Pierre-Yves Geoffard is the Director of the PSE and is also a Full Research Professor at CNRS and at the “Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales” (EHESS). His main research areas are in the economic analysis of health policy and in risk and insurance economics. His research has been published in leading academic journals such as Econometrica, American Economic Review, Biometrika, Journal of Economic Theory, International Economic Review, RAND Journal of Economics, and Journal of Health Economics. He received a best paper award in 2009 for an article published in Health Economics. He has also been an Associate Editor of Health Economics and a member of the National AIDS Council (France) over recent years. https://www.parisschoolofeconomics.eu/en/geoffard-pierre-yves/
  • Carine Milcent is a Research Professor in economics and econometrics at the PSE and at CNRS. After finishing her Ph.D. in Paris, she became a postdoc at Stanford University. She has also been a visiting Associate Professor at HEC (Lausanne, Switzerland) and at the School of Economics and Management at Tsing Hua University (Beijing, China). Carine received several grants, including a Fulbright fellowship. Her research interests lie in health and healthcare, including health inequality and access to health care, in China and France. She has expertise in quantitative approaches and mixed methods research. She has been teaching health economics and econometrics in various universities (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Dauphine University in France, CNAM in France, etc.). On her free time, Carine is a mindfulness coach, which helps her to look at health and well-being from a different perspective. https://www.parisschoolofeconomics.eu/en/milcent-carine/
  • Claudia Senik is a Full Professor at the PSE and University Paris-Sorbonne and a Research Fellow at IZA. Her main research interests lie in the micro-econometric analysis of income distribution and subjective well-being. She uses cross-cultural comparative methods and incorporates Big Data in her analysis of happiness. Her research has been published in the Economic Journal, the Journal of Public Economics, the Review of Economics and Statistics, Social Science and Medicine, the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, and Economica, among others. https://www.parisschoolofeconomics.eu/en/senik-claudia/
  • Daniel Waldenström is Professor of economics at the Research Institute of Industrial Economics, IFN, and a visiting professor at the Paris School of Economics (PSE). He received a Ph.D. in economics from the Stockholm School of Economics (SSE) and a second Ph.D. in economic history from Lund University. He has previous taught at Uppsala University, UCLA, PSE and SSE. Daniel Waldenström’s main research interests concern income and wealth inequality, intergenerational mobility, and taxation and economic history. http://www.uueconomics.se/danielw/

Programme Supervisor: Bénédicte Apouey


SCHEDULE

Monday June, 24
9.30 am - 10.45 am Pierre-Yves Geoffard, Introduction
10.45 am - 11.15 am Coffee break
11.15 am - 12.30 pm Sarah Fleche, The Measurement and Validity of Well-Being
12.30 pm - 2.00 pm Lunch
2.00 pm - 3.15 pm Sarah Fleche, The Measurement and Validity of Well-Being
3.15 pm - 3.45 pm Coffee break
3.45 pm - 5.00 pm Bénédicte Apouey, Measuring Health and Health Inequality
6 pm – 7 pm Gilles Saint Paul, Plenary Lecture
From 7 pm Welcome cocktail

Tuesday June, 25
9.30 am - 10.45 am Bénédicte Apouey, Measuring Health and Health Inequality
10.45 am - 11.15 am Coffee break
11.15 am - 12.30 pm Carine Milcent, The Multidimensionality of Health: Self-Assessed Health and its Biases
12.30 pm - 2.00 pm Lunch
2.00 pm - 3.15 pm Carine Milcent, The Multidimensionality of Health: Self-Assessed Health and its Biases
3.15 pm - 3.45 pm Coffee break
3.45 pm - 5.00 pm Carine Milcent, The Multidimensionality of Health: Self-Assessed Health and its Biases
From 6 pm Social Event

Wednesday June, 26
9.15 am - 10.30 am Pierre-Yves Geoffard, Administrative data: Opportunities and Challenges for Research in Health Economics
10.30 am - 10.45 am Coffee break
10.45 am - 12.00 pm Pierre-Yves Geoffard, Administrative data: Opportunities and Challenges for Research in Health Economics
12.00 pm - 1.15 pm Lunch
1.15 pm - 2.30 pm Clément Bellet, Big Data and Well-Being
2.30 pm - 2.45 pm Coffee break
2.45 pm - 4.00 pm Claudia Senik, The Easterlin Paradox, Adaptation, Comparison, and Inequality
4.00 pm - 4.15 pm Coffee Break
4.15 pm - 5.45 pm Workshop/Workgroup/Discussion

Thursday June, 27
9.30 am - 10.45 am Claudia Senik, The Easterlin Paradox, Adaptation, Comparison, and Inequality
10.45 am - 11.15 am Coffee break
11.15 am - 12.30 pm Claudia Senik, The Easterlin Paradox, Adaptation, Comparison, and Inequality
12.30 pm - 2.00 pm Lunch
2.00 pm - 3.15 pm Claudia Senik, The Easterlin Paradox, Adaptation, Comparison, and Inequality
3.15 pm - 3.45 pm Coffee break
3.45 pm - 5.00 pm Clément Bellet, Beyond the Easterlin Paradox: Consumption, Inequality and Wellbeing
From 6 pm Social Event

Friday June, 28
9.15 am - 10.30 am Bénédicte Apouey, The Effect of Income on Health
10.30 am - 10.45 am Coffee break
10.45 am - 12.00 pm Bénédicte Apouey, The Effect of Income on Health
12.00 pm - 1.15 pm Lunch
1.15 pm - 2.30 pm Daniel Waldenström, Income Inequality and Health
2.30 pm - 2.45 pm Coffee break
2.45 pm - 4.00 pm Daniel Waldenström, Income Inequality and Health
4.00 pm - 4.15 pm Coffee Break
4.15 pm - 5.45 pm Workshop/Workgroup/Discussion
From 6.15 pm Social Farewell cocktail/certificates


  • Participant profiles, Fees, application file and deadline... How to apply?
  • The complete 2019 brochure is available in pdf (106 pages, 5 Mo)
  • You’ve chosen this programme and you want to apply? Go directly to the website www.pse-application.eu
  • Should you have any questions, please feel free to contact us directly: summer-school psemail.eu